Mother’s Irises

The iris is the state flower of Tennessee, where I grew up.  The classic color is purple, but my mother planted some unusual, beautiful ones on our farm.  In addition to purple, there Iris from Mother's bulbswere peach-colored, yellow, and white ones.  They were much bigger than the usual irises, almost like the orchid corsages you would wear to church on Easter Sunday.

I don’t remember where she got the starts for them.  Irises grow from roots called rhizomes that spread out as they grow.  When they get too thick, they stop blooming, so you have to thin them out periodically.  Someone gave Mother the starts and she planted them in the yard beside the house.  They grew and grew, blooming copiously every year.  She thinned them and gave some to my sister Sherrie, who planted the starts at her house.

Years later the irises at Sherrie’s house got too thick, so she thinned them and gave starts to our niece Judy.  Judy planted them at her house, and took starts with her again when she moved.  Judy also planted some at her mother’s house.  She sent me a photo last week, the one you see above–the irises are still blooming, still growing, years after my mother passed away.  The sight of that iris took me back to the rows of flowers blooming bravely in the back yard, so top-heavy that the wind or rain would easily beat them to the ground.  They bloomed in April in Tennessee, but are just opening now in cooler northern climes.

Mother loved her flowers, and irises always remind me of her.  Happy Mothers Day to all.

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Generations of Irises

Iris from Mother's bulbsMy mother was always fond of flowers.  Wherever we lived, she planted bulbs and weeded flower beds.  Our yard was never elaborate or manicured, and she certainly never read gardening books or drew plans.  But I remember four o’clocks which bloomed in the evening shade, and beds of zinnias and marigolds scorching in the summer sun.  She planted tiger lilies on the edges of the back yard at the house we lived in when I was in elementary school and phlox clinging to a rocky outcropping by the kitchen door.

When we moved to the farm someone gave Mother several varieties of irises.  Some of them were the classic purple ones which are the state flower of Tennessee.  Others had huge blossoms in unusual colors, including peach.  They were the last of the bulbs to bloom each spring (technically speaking, they grew from rhizomes) and gave us a week or two of glory before the heat set in.  In order to keep them blooming year after year, the rhizomes have to be thinned out.  Mother gave some to my sister Sherrie, who planted them in her yard.  As recently as three years ago they were still blossoming.

I’m not sure how some of Sherrie’s rhizomes got to my niece Judy in Ohio, but they did.  The photo is of a peach-colored iris blooming in Judy’s yard this spring.  She has two plants that still come up and flower, descendants of the original stock that was planted in the late ’60s on our farm.  Out of those roots….maybe they will last long enough to provide rhizomes for another generation, another yard, more springs.